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51
HMS Crescent
HMS Crescent
CRESCENT was an old cruiser 1892, selected for depot ship duties in February 1916 and fitted out on 25 Mar 16. Submarine depot ship at Scapa Flow 1917 to August 1918. From August 1918-1919, CRESCENT was the depot ship for the 3rd Submarine Flotilla at Rosyth. From 9 May 19 at Oban. 
 
52
J.R. Auty
J.R. Auty
Churchman's Cigarette Card, Rugby Internationals (card no 1 in series of 50) 
 
53
Jack & Eddie Auty Wedding
Jack & Eddie Auty Wedding
 
 
54
Jack Auty
Jack Auty
 
 
55
Jack Joshua Collins
Jack Joshua Collins
 
 
56
James Henry & Rachel Auty
James Henry & Rachel Auty
 
 
57
James Henry Auty and the Knur & Spell players
James Henry Auty and the Knur & Spell players
James Henry Auty (third from the left) and fellow knur and spell players
The man in the center is holding the "trap" in his right hand

The actual location is unknown as are the other men in the photo but it is probably outside a local drinking establishment as the game has strong links with such places
It may be the Swan Inn (193 to 201) Middle Road, Earlsheaton as James Henry Auty lived at 207 Middle Road on the 1910 Valuation record
 
 
58
Joan & Doreen Auty
Joan & Doreen Auty
 
 
59
Joan Auty
Joan Auty
 
 
60
John Auty ?
John Auty ?
Although not actually identified he is described as the Grandfather of Albert Auty (1873-1958) which could make him John Auty 
 
61
John Joseph Auty passport photo 1920
John Joseph Auty passport photo 1920
Photograph on the passport application of John Joseph Auty dated 22 January 1920
Also gives a physical description as:
Age: 37
Stature: 5 feet 6 inches
Forehead: High
Eyes: Brown
Nose: Medium
Mouth: Small
Chin: Round
Hair: Brown
Complexion: Fair
Face: Oval
 
 
62
Joseph & Walter Auty
Joseph & Walter Auty
Walter Auty and his son Joseph Sanderson Auty taken some time in the 1920's 
 
63
King's South Africa Medal
King's South Africa Medal
The fourth campaign medal for the Second Boer War and the second which could be awarded for service in South Africa, the King's South Africa Medal, was instituted in 1902 and was the first British campaign medal to be instituted by King Edward VII. Recipients had to have served in the theatre of war between 1 January 1902 and 31 May 1902 inclusive and completed 18 months service, not necessarily continuous, in the conflict prior to 1 June 1902. The medal recognised service in the difficult latter phases of the war and rewarded those who, by their long service in the field, had brought the campaign to a successful conclusion. The medal was never awarded singly, but was always paired with the Queen's South Africa Medal 
 
64
Lavinia Auty (later Gledhill)
Lavinia Auty (later Gledhill)
 
 
65
Leonard Auty
Leonard Auty
 
 
66
Lilian, Dorothy? & Violet Auty
Lilian, Dorothy? & Violet Auty
left: Lilian Auty
middle: probably Dorothy
right: Violet Amy
 
 
67
Martha Ann Auty 1887 - 1997
Martha Ann Auty 1887 - 1997
Martha lived to be over 100 years old 
 
68
Mary Auty (nee Cordingley)
Mary Auty (nee Cordingley)
 
 
69
Mary Auty (nee Cordingley)
Mary Auty (nee Cordingley)
Mary is the young girl on the left when she was in service in a house on Caulms Wood Road, Dewsbury 
 
70
Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) Medal - Civil Division
Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) Medal - Civil Division
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is the "order of chivalry of British constitutional monarchy"; rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil Service.
It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes, in civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male, or dame if female

The five classes of appointment to the Order are, in descending order of precedence:
1. Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (GBE)
2. Knight Commander or Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE or DBE)
3. Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE)
4. Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE)
5. Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE) 
 
71
Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) Medal - Military Division
Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) Medal - Military Division
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is the "order of chivalry of British constitutional monarchy"; rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil Service.
It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes, in civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male, or dame if female

The five classes of appointment to the Order are, in descending order of precedence:
1. Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (GBE)
2. Knight Commander or Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE or DBE)
3. Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE)
4. Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE)
5. Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE) 
 
72
Mervyn Auty M.B.E.
Mervyn Auty M.B.E.
Awarded MBE in new year’s honors 1997: For services to the British Limbless ex-Service Men's Association 
 
73
Military Medal
Military Medal
Until 1993, the Military Medal (MM) was a military decoration awarded to personnel of the British Army and other services, and formerly also to personnel of other Commonwealth countries, below commissioned rank, for bravery in battle on land.
The medal was established on 25 March 1916.
It was the other ranks' equivalent to the Military Cross (MC), which was awarded to commissioned officers and, rarely, to warrant officers, although WOs could also be awarded the MM. The MM ranked below the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM), which was also awarded to non-commissioned members of the Army. 
 
74
Morley Main Pit Disaster Tapestry
Morley Main Pit Disaster Tapestry
A tapestry showing the names and ages of 34 miners and boys killed when a gas explosion ripped through the Morley Main Colliery in Albert Road on October 7, 1872.
The tapestry was designed and sewn by Morley Elderly Action Craft Group.
One of a number of tapestries commemorating local events situated in Morley Town Hall

Thomas Auty aged 48 is in the top right hand corner 
 
75
Naval Baltic War Medal
Naval Baltic War Medal
The Baltic Medal was a campaign medal approved in 1856, for issue to officers and men of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, and Royal Sappers and Miners who served in Baltic Sea operations against Russia in the Baltic theatre of the Crimean War between March 1854 and August 1855. The medal primarily covered naval actions but was also awarded to 106 men of the Royal Sappers and Miners who were landed to place demolition charges against Russian fortifications at Bomarsund and Sveaborg 
 
76
Naval General Service Medal (1847)
Naval General Service Medal (1847)
The Naval General Service Medal (NGSM) was a campaign medal approved in 1847, for issue to officers and men of the Royal Navy. (A handful of awards were made to officers and men of the British Army, present on board HM's ships at qualifying actions.) William Wyon was the designer. Admiral Thomas Bladen Capel was one of the members of the board that authorized the medal.
The NGSM was retrospectively awarded for various naval actions during the period 1793–1840, a period including the French Revolutionary Wars, the Napoleonic Wars, and the Anglo-American War of 1812. Each battle or action covered by the medal was represented by a clasp on the ribbon. The medal was never issued without a clasp, 231 of which were sanctioned. The clasps covered a variety of actions, from boat service to ship to ship skirmishes all the way to major fleet actions such as the Battle of Trafalgar.
Sir John Hindmarsh and Admiral of the Fleet Sir James Alexander Gordon were awarded medals with seven clasps, the most awarded to any individual. Four men qualified for six clasps, and fourteen men qualified for five clasps.
A point to note is that the medal was only awarded to surviving claimants; one had both to have survived until 1847 and then to actively apply for it. A combination of factors, from general illiteracy to limited publicity for the new medal meant that very many did not. There are substantially fewer medals issued when compared with the number of men who served during this period; frequently the number of claimants for individual clasps was reckoned in single figures—for ten clasps, there were no claimants. The Admiralty awarded 20,933 medals in total—most with a single clasp.
The final date for submitting claims was 1 May 1851. The medal was awarded only to surviving claimants; next of kin could not apply for a medal on behalf of a deceased relative. However, the medal was awarded to next of kin of those claimants who had died between the date of their application and the date of presentation.
This medal and its army counterpart, the Military General Service Medal, were amongst the first real British campaign medals, the first to be issued to all ranks for serving in combat actions. 
 
77
Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) Medal - Civil Division
Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) Medal - Civil Division
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is the "order of chivalry of British constitutional monarchy"; rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil Service.
It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes, in civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male, or dame if female

The five classes of appointment to the Order are, in descending order of precedence:
1. Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (GBE)
2. Knight Commander or Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE or DBE)
3. Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE)
4. Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE)
5. Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE) 
 
78
Percy & Doreen Blake (nee Auty)
Percy & Doreen Blake (nee Auty)
 
 
79
Percy Blake
Percy Blake
 
 
80
Percy Blake
Percy Blake
 
 
81
Pilot - Godfrey Auty
Pilot - Godfrey Auty
stencilled on the nose cone of the Bristol 188 at the RAF Museum Cosford 
 
82
Portrait of Thomas Busby
Portrait of Thomas Busby
Thomas Busby was arrested, tried and convicted of the murder of his father in law Daniel Auty in 1702
The portrait hangs in the Busby Stoop Inn at Kirby Wiske nr Thirsk,  
 
83
Princess Irene
Princess Irene
 
 
84
Queens South Africa Medal
Queens South Africa Medal
The Queen's South Africa Medal was instituted by Queen Victoria in 1900, for award to military personnel, civilian officials and war correspondents who served in South Africa during the Second Boer War from 11 October 1899 to 31 May 1902.
Altogether twenty-six clasps were awarded to recipients of the Queen's South Africa Medal, to indicate particular actions and campaigns of the Second Boer War.
Three versions of the medal are known. Since the war was initially expected to be of short duration and to reach its conclusion in 1900, the first medals were struck with the years "1899" and "1900" on the reverse. Approximately fifty of these medals were awarded before it became evident that the war was going to drag on much longer. The rest of the dated medals which had already been minted, therefore had these dates machined off. The third version was minted with an altered reverse and without the years 
 
85
Richard Auty in the National Lottery Run
Richard Auty in the National Lottery Run
Richard Auty running 5 miles in the National Lottery Run on 21 July 2013
Run Time 40.01 minutes.
He was 2388th out of 10,000 Runners

 
 
86
Richard Hatt, Angelina and Percy Richard Auty
Richard Hatt, Angelina and Percy Richard Auty
Studio photograph of Richard Hatt Auty his wife Angelina and son Percy Richard Auty 
 
87
Sarah Ann Auty (nee Firth) & Clarence William Auty
Sarah Ann Auty (nee Firth) & Clarence William Auty
 
 
88
Sarah Harley (nee Auty)
Sarah Harley (nee Auty)
 
 
89
Second China War Medal
Second China War Medal
The Second China War Medal was issued by the British Government in 1861 to members of the British and Indian armies and Royal Navy who took part in the Second Opium War of 1857 to 1860 against China.
The medal was designed by William Wyon.
The medal's obverse shows the diademed head of Queen Victoria with the legend ‘VICTORIA REGINA’. The reverse has the same shield bearing the Royal Arms, with a palm tree and trophy of arms behind, as found on the First China War Medal with the inscription ‘ARMIS EXPOSCERE PACIM’ above and the word ‘CHINA’ in the exergue below. The suspender is the same as that used on the Indian Mutiny Medal.
The medal was issued with the following clasps:
China 1842 (awarded to those who had already received the medal for the First China War)
Fatshan 1857
Canton 1857
Taku Forts 1858
Taku Forts 1860
Pekin 1860
The medal could also be awarded without a clasp.
The 32 mm ribbon is crimson with yellow edges (originally five equal stripes of green, white, red, yellow and blue, edged with red). The medals are named in indented Roman capitals for the Army, while members of the Royal Marines and Royal Navy were usually issued with unnamed medals 
 
90
Squire Auty
Squire Auty
Portrait of Squire Auty by John Hunter Thompson 
 
91
Stanley Auty
Stanley Auty
Corporal Stanley Auty 480126.
Unit: 457th Field Company, Royal Engineers.
Death: 23 October 1918.
Son of the late Fredrick and Jessie Auty, of Leeds; husband of Annie Ridley Tomlinson (formerly Auty), of 13, Falmouth Grove, South Accommodation Rd., Hunslet, Leeds. 
 
92
Submarine P311
Submarine P311
HM Submarine P 311 was the only unnamed T-class boat, she was due to have been named Tutenkhamen but lost before she could be renamed
She was fitted to carry 2 Chariot human torpedoes.

HMS P 311 (Cdr. Richard Douglas Cayley, DSO and 2 Bars, RN) was lost while engaged in Operation Principle, the Chariot attack on Italian cruisers at La Maddalena.
HMS P 311 left Scotland in November 1942 with sister-boats HMS Thunderbold and HMS Trooper after addition of human torpedo deck-mounted watertight containers, direct for Malta.
P 311 departed from Malta on 28 December 1942.
She sent her last signal on 31 December 1942 from position 38º10'N, 11º30'E.
After this signal she was not heard from again and she is presumed sunk by Italian mines in the approaches to Maddalena on or around 2 January 1943.
She was reported overdue on 8 January 1943 when she failed to return to base.

The ultimate fate of P311 fate was unknown until in May 2016 Italian wreck-hunter, Massimo Bondone, discovered the submarine's' 80 metre-long carcass off the coast of the La Tavolara, Sardinia, at a depth of 100 metres

The Royal Navy say that the HMS P 311 would almost certainly not be moved from its final resting place, irrespective of whether or not bodies are sealed inside.
“Wrecks are only raised if there are extremely compelling historical or operational reasons to do so,”
“Once a military vessel sinks it becomes a war grave and is left where it lies.”
 
 
93
The Assembly Memorial Chairs on their visit to Wakefield Cathedral September/November 2016
The Assembly Memorial Chairs on their visit to Wakefield Cathedral September/November 2016
'Assembly' brings something tangible from Flanders to be installed in significant sites in the British Isles, which in their own way already commemorate casualties of the First World War.

In the summer of 2018 after a journey of five years and 16 different installations in England, Wales, Scotland and the Scottish Isles, Northern Ireland, and Ireland, the installation returns to Ypres in July

On the final day of the project, at the end of August 2018, the five chairs go for one day to the Square where they will be joined in a grans 'assembly' with thousands of empty chairs from all over the country and abroad. This final moment of the installation of thousands of empty chairs on the Square in Ypres, will be photographed and filmed from the Bell Tower of the museum.
 
 
94
Thomas Edward Awty Jnr
Thomas Edward Awty Jnr
 
 
95
Treasure Auty
Treasure Auty
 
 
96
Treasure Auty
Treasure Auty
 
 
97
UK Silver War Badge
UK Silver War Badge
The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The badge, sometimes known as the "Discharge Badge", the "Wound Badge" or "Services Rendered Badge", was first issued in September 1916, along with an official certificate of entitlement.
The large sterling silver lapel badge was intended to be worn on civilian clothes. The decoration was introduced as an award of "King's silver" for having received wounds or injury during loyal war service to the Crown's authority. A secondary causation for its introduction was that a practice had developed in the early years of the war in the United Kingdom where some women took it upon themselves to confront and publicly embarrass men of fighting age they saw in public places who were not in military uniform, by ostentatiously presenting them with white feathers, as a suggestion of cowardice. As the war had developed substantial numbers of servicemen who had been discharged from His Majesty's Forces with wounds that rendered them unfit for war service, but which were not obvious from their outward appearance, found themselves being harassed in such a manner and the badge, to be worn on the right breast while in civilian dress, was a means of discouraging such incidents being directed at ex-forces' personnel. It was forbidden to wear the badge on a military uniform.
The badge bears the royal cipher of "GRI" (for Georgius Rex Imperator; George, King and Emperor) and around the rim "For King and Empire - Services Rendered".
Each badge was uniquely numbered on the reverse. The War Office maintained a register recording which serviceman each one had been issued to in United Kingdom, and the governments of Canada, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa and Rhodesia maintained their own registers of issue (which were copied to the War Office in London to provide it with an Imperial master-record). Silver War Badges issued by the Empire's dominion nations had their identification numbers on the reverse prefixed with the first letter of the issuing nation: Australia with the letter 'A', Canada 'C', etc. In the United Kingdom the War Office made it known that it would not replace Silver War Badges if they were lost, however if one was handed into a police station then it would be returned to the War Office, which would seek to return it using its records to its recipient.
A similar award called the King's Badge was issued in World War II. Although each was issued with a certificate, unlike its World War I counterpart it was not individually numbered. 
 
98
Violet Amy Auty
Violet Amy Auty
 
 
99
Wedding of Clement Auty & Annie Pinder
Wedding of Clement Auty & Annie Pinder
 
 
100
Wedding of Cyril Auty & Florence May Price 1944
Wedding of Cyril Auty & Florence May Price 1944
 
 

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