Notes


Matches 1 to 50 of 13,003

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 261» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
1

Registered Sep Qtr 1861, St George in the East, Reg Dst ref 1c/759 
Family F4206
 
2
 
AUTY, George William (I3486)
 
3
Ezra Auty, 21, Bachelor, Painter, Jowetts Place Birks Morley, Solomon Auty, Quarry Man
Mary Giles, 23, Spinster, Domestic Servant, Mount Pleasant Morley, John Giles, Shoemaker
by banns, both sign register, witness: Josiah Giles & Esther Ann Giles
Registered Jun Qtr 1892, Dewsbury Reg Dst ref 9b/1005 
Family F291
 
4
George Henry Auty, 20, Bachelor, Stuff Weaver, Grace Street, Stuff Dresser
Elizabeth Walls, 19, Spinster, - , Queen Street, Christopher Walls, Labourer
by banns, both sign register, witness: Robert Louth & Martha Wheatley (x)
Registered Mar Qtr 1881, Leeds Reg Dst ref 9b/445 
Family F1799
 
5
John Auty, 30, Bachelor, Engineer, West Ardsley, Joseph Auty, Miner
Ruth Scholes, 22, Spinster, - , Ardsley, David Scholes, Ston Merchant
by banns, both sign register, witness: Absalom Scholes & George Auty

Registered June Qtr 1846, Dewsbury Reg Dst ref 22/35 
Family F1926
 
6
Registered Dec Qtr 1914, Barnsley Reg Dst ref 9c/306
18 Hours old 
AUTY, Florrie (I6783)
 
7
Whether Employer, Worker, or Working on Own Account: Worker 
AUTY, Arnold Whitehead (I2899)
 
8 Administration of Personal Estate of Emmanuel Auty late of 4 Back-Union-street Huddersfield in the County of York Shoemaker a Widower who died 4 Oct 1886 at 4 Back-Union-street was granted at Wakefield to Emma Fox (Wife of Henry Fox) of 4 Back-Union-street the Sister and one of the Next of Kin. Personal Estate £22 10s AUTY, Sarah (I1182)
 
9 Administration of Personal Estate of Emmanuel Auty late of 4 Back-Union-street Huddersfield in the County of York Shoemaker a Widower who died 4 Oct 1886 at 4 Back-Union-street was granted at Wakefield to Emma Fox (Wife of Henry Fox) of 4 Back-Union-street the Sister and one of the Next of Kin. Personal Estate £22 10s AUTY, Emanuel (I2246)
 
10 Administration of tghe Personal Estate of Emma Auty late of 25 Richmond-road Bradford in the County of York Spinster who died 10 April 1890 at Menston in the said County was granted at the Principal Registry to Samuel Albert Auty of Bolton Old Hall in the Parish of Bradford Printer and Stationer the Brother and one of the Next of Kin. Personal Estate £101 18s AUTY, Emma (I1902)
 
11 Alice Jane Auty of 171 Brunswick-road Poplar Middlesex (wife of Richard William Auty) died 14 Mar 1922 Administration London 6 January to Lilian Violet Auty spinster. Effects £61 15s 6d ELWOOD, Alice Jane (I4475)
 
12 Angelina Elizabeth Auty of 1 Glebe-road St George Bristol widow died 27 Apr 1916 Administration (with Will) Bristol 13 May to Arthur William Auty mineral water manufacturer. Effects £270 PENTNEY, Angelina Elizabeth (I2952)
 
13 Ann Auty of Batley Yorkshire spinster died 22 Nov 1899 at Bradford Administration Wakefield 12 Dec to Enoch Auty coal-miner Effects £30 AUTY, Ann (I1795)
 
14 as Clayton living next door to rest of family with William Furness, unmarried Butcher age 52 AUTY, James (I3459)
 
15 David Auty of 4 East Parade Morley Yorkshire died 20 January 1914 Probate Wakefield 25 March to Josiah Auty architects and Ruth Asquith Auty spinster. Effects £1474 AUTY, David (I2359)
 
16 Eli Auty, 28, Batchelor, Accountant, 17 Campbell Avenue Blackpool, James Arthur Auty, Cabinet Maker
Doris Potts, 24, Spinster, - , 70 Osborne Rd South Shore, James Potts, Cabinet Maker
by banns, both sign register, witness James Potts & Sophia Auty

Registered Dec Qtr 1930, Fylde Reg Dst ref 8e/1196 
Family F3499
 
17 Hannah Auty of 9 Corporation-road Carlisle widow died 6 March 1915 Probate Carlisle 3 May to David Berry Auty grocer and Thomas Hewetson cheif acctuary of Carlisle and County Savings Bank. Effects £2214 3s 6d SCOTT, Hannah (I7086)
 
18 Sam Auty of Bracken-hill Mirfield Yorkshire maltster and corn-merchant died 18 April 1898 Probate Wakefield 28 September to Elizabeth auty widow Edmund Hemingway the younger corn-merchant William Hemingway accountant and William Crosland Thornton hardware-merchant Effects £6533 17s 3d AUTY, Samuel (I199)
 
19 'One of the Most Notorious Thieves and Clippers in England'
The Life and Death of Daniel Awty (1644-1702)

In the 17th century, the village of Dewsbury was, according to Raine, ‘one of the most disreputable in Yorkshire’, and here in 1644, was born Daniel AWTY. The family was quite an ancient one, the surname in its various forms (Auty, Awty, Autie, Otty and so on) appearing in the records connected with Dewsbury from the mid 14th century onwards.
All the various branches of the Awty family, again quoting Canon Raine, ‘seem to have been adept in dishonest practices’ and they were certainly well known to Justice Pikering, the Puritan magistrate, the men for drunkenness and profane language (especially on the Lord’s Day), and the women for making affrays upon their neighbours. They found it convenient to live in isolated farmhouses away from the village where they were unlikely to be taken unawares in their dubious occupations, and where the dogs would give early warning of approaching strangers.
Edward AWTY married Alice Tebb in October, 1635. There was a stillborn child buried the same year, but only Mercy, baptised 1637 and Daniel, 1644 seem to have been their surviving children.
Most of the Awtys were ostensibly clothiers by occupation but Daniel was no doubt initiated into other skills as he grew up in the family home on the moor side, and by the time he was thirty he had become the best clipper in the district, acknowledged as such by his rivals in the trade.
Success breeds envy, unfortunately, and no sooner was Daniel doing well than he was informed upon, convicted and had his first taste of life behind prison bars. This pattern was repeated many times as the years went by, and though the regime in York Castle goal was dreadful to endure, a stay there had its advantages. Daniel was able to make many useful contacts during his incarcerations, not to mention keeping abreast of the latest developments in his own particular line of business.
It was whilst he was in York Castle in the summer of 1675 that Awty and some other like-minded scoundrels began to consider whether it would be possible to make away with the splendid communion plate then in use at services in the Minster, “what a rare booty it would be, if it could be got,’ they mused, and one night in the following February ‘gott’ it was, the Minster being broken into and most of the plate carried away. Awty was out of goal by this time, and living in York.
The criminals his their tracks so well that no charges could be brought until 1686, a full nine years later, and then only through the loose talk of Daniel’s sister Mercy, who had come to live in Bedern. She, it seems, was a lady whose tongue ran away with her at the slightest encouragement, and tow men who had drawn her out to some tune proceeded to lay information against Awty and his sister.
The first was Joseph LOCKWOOD, clothier, now of Kirkheaton but resident at the time of the robbery in a mansion near the Minster where he was some kind of upper servant. Raine believed that this same Lockwood had been gaoler of York Castle and would therefore know both Awtys well. Lockwood deposed that shortly before the plate was stolen, Awty had hinted to him that, living where he did, he could be very useful to the gang in the quick concealment of the booty after its removal from the Minster premises. Mercy, he said, had told him many times, both at Dewsbury and more recently in York, that her brother had got the Minster plate, and that it had been conveyed to their mother’s house in Dewsbury in a coarse canvas bag.
The other informant, James Dinsdall of the Minster Yard, an acquaintance of only two or three months, could quote Mercy as saying ‘that she had the Minster plate, which was stolen from thence some years ago, in her arms at her mother’s house in Dewsbury when and where her brother Daniel Autie was present. She further said that the plate, or a great part of it, was there melted down, and part of the table upon which it was melted burnt in the melting of it. And he also heard her at some times speaking of the said plate, say that she would make the Minster bells ring, and that, if she pleased, she could hang a hundred of them. And he hath heard her say that her brother would have given her money to be gone out of the city of York to Dewsbury because she made much talk and discourse of him’.
Mercy’s reckless chatter earned them both a spell in York Castle upon this charge, but it was only hearsay evidence and could not be proved. Awty was soon a free man once more, and an incident in a York street shows his vicious, bullying nature. It seems that Awty had brought a bill of indictment before a York court which had been thrown out by the grand jury there. Now one of these same jurors, an esteemed glass painter named Benedict Hosley, suddenly found himself face to face with Awty in a narrow street with no way of escape. Awty recognised him at once and confronted the timid tradesman in a most frightening manner.
‘Thou art a pitiful fellow,’ he sneared contemptuously, ‘There is thirteen or fourteen of you’ (meaning the grand jury), ‘and I would sell you all to the Devil for twopence apiece.’
Money he certainly had now, and in course of time he looked for a property where he could carry on his counterfeiting in maximum safety. Because of the number of coining gangs operating there, the area encompassed by the towns of Thirsk, Hemsley and Boroughbridge was known in those days as The Unholy Triangle. Here, on the banks of the Swale, near Kirkby Wiske, Awty, now calling himself Otty, found a lonely farmhouse ideally suited to his purpose. The land round about was completely flat, no road led past the property, and any approaching strangers would be visible long before they neared the farm.
Tradition says that he fitted out the cellar there with all the equipment needed for counterfeiting, and with entry by means of a secret staircase from the room above, was able to carry on completely undisturbed. His daughter, Elizabeth, married a man called BUSBY who joined Daniel in the illegal trade, though the two men, apparently, never got on well.
One night in the year 1702, Awty and Busby had a violent quarrel, supposed because Busby felt he was not getting his fair share of the profits. There was a struggle, and Busby strangled his father-in-law. He dragged the body out of the cellar and concealed it under some bushes at a distance from the house. He then returned, covered in mud, sat in his chair and proceeded to get very drunk.
Her husband’s suspicious appearance and behaviour, coupled with her father’s non-appearance at the supper table, aroused Elizabeth’s deepest forebodings. A week later, she denounced Busby, a search was made, and the body found. After being tried and convicted of his father-in-law’s murder, the unfortunate man suffered death by hanging, after which the body was hung in chains on a gibbet near Sand Hutton. The gibbet was long known as Busby Stoop, and the inn there bears the name to this day. The farmhouse, Danotty Hall, is still standing, though much altered since Daniel’s time.
THORSBY, riding north in 1703, wrote in his diary, ‘along the banks of the Swale, and the very pleasant gardens of Sir William Robinson, late Mayo of York, but a few miles after, a most doleful object of Mr Busby hanging in chains for the murder of his father-in-law, Daniel Awty….. who having too little honesty to balance his skill in engraving & etc…., was generally suspected for coining and other indirect ways of attaining that estate which was the occasion of his death, even within sight of his own house.’

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Calendar of State Papers Domestic
Calendar of Treasury Books
West Riding Quarter Sessions Roll: Wakefield Record Office.
Dewsbury P.R. (1538-1653) ed Chadwick: Y.A.S. Claremont, Leeds
Depositions from York Castle: Surtees Society Vol. 40 (1861)
Diary of Oliver Heywood: Volume II p.287.
Criminal Chronology of York Castle: Burdekin (1867)
Diary of Ralph Thoresby: ed. Rev J Hunter (1830)
Justice’s Notebook of Captin John Pickering: Thorsby Society Volume XI Misc.
Thirsk and District Past and Present: Hall (1914)

My Thanks to Miss Lilian Robinson, Dr. G Redmonds and Mr. Bill Harm, Chairman, Thirsk Museum, for information supplied.

NB. The above including the bibliography is retyped from pages 23-25 of a book of unknown title sent to myself by Pam Auty
John Blake - March 2004.




 
AUTY, Daniel (I262)
 
20 'One of the Most Notorious Thieves and Clippers in England'
The Life and Death of Daniel Awty (1644-1702)

In the 17th century, the village of Dewsbury was, according to Raine, ‘one of the most disreputable in Yorkshire’, and here in 1644, was born Daniel AWTY. The family was quite an ancient one, the surname in its various forms (Auty, Awty, Autie, Otty and so on) appearing in the records connected with Dewsbury from the mid 14th century onwards.
All the various branches of the Awty family, again quoting Canon Raine, ‘seem to have been adept in dishonest practices’ and they were certainly well known to Justice Pikering, the Puritan magistrate, the men for drunkenness and profane language (especially on the Lord’s Day), and the women for making affrays upon their neighbours. They found it convenient to live in isolated farmhouses away from the village where they were unlikely to be taken unawares in their dubious occupations, and where the dogs would give early warning of approaching strangers.
Edward AWTY married Alice Tebb in October, 1635. There was a stillborn child buried the same year, but only Mercy, baptised 1637 and Daniel, 1644 seem to have been their surviving children.
Most of the Awtys were ostensibly clothiers by occupation but Daniel was no doubt initiated into other skills as he grew up in the family home on the moor side, and by the time he was thirty he had become the best clipper in the district, acknowledged as such by his rivals in the trade.
Success breeds envy, unfortunately, and no sooner was Daniel doing well than he was informed upon, convicted and had his first taste of life behind prison bars. This pattern was repeated many times as the years went by, and though the regime in York Castle goal was dreadful to endure, a stay there had its advantages. Daniel was able to make many useful contacts during his incarcerations, not to mention keeping abreast of the latest developments in his own particular line of business.
It was whilst he was in York Castle in the summer of 1675 that Awty and some other like-minded scoundrels began to consider whether it would be possible to make away with the splendid communion plate then in use at services in the Minster, “what a rare booty it would be, if it could be got,’ they mused, and one night in the following February ‘gott’ it was, the Minster being broken into and most of the plate carried away. Awty was out of goal by this time, and living in York.
The criminals his their tracks so well that no charges could be brought until 1686, a full nine years later, and then only through the loose talk of Daniel’s sister Mercy, who had come to live in Bedern. She, it seems, was a lady whose tongue ran away with her at the slightest encouragement, and tow men who had drawn her out to some tune proceeded to lay information against Awty and his sister.
The first was Joseph LOCKWOOD, clothier, now of Kirkheaton but resident at the time of the robbery in a mansion near the Minster where he was some kind of upper servant. Raine believed that this same Lockwood had been gaoler of York Castle and would therefore know both Awtys well. Lockwood deposed that shortly before the plate was stolen, Awty had hinted to him that, living where he did, he could be very useful to the gang in the quick concealment of the booty after its removal from the Minster premises. Mercy, he said, had told him many times, both at Dewsbury and more recently in York, that her brother had got the Minster plate, and that it had been conveyed to their mother’s house in Dewsbury in a coarse canvas bag.
The other informant, James Dinsdall of the Minster Yard, an acquaintance of only two or three months, could quote Mercy as saying ‘that she had the Minster plate, which was stolen from thence some years ago, in her arms at her mother’s house in Dewsbury when and where her brother Daniel Autie was present. She further said that the plate, or a great part of it, was there melted down, and part of the table upon which it was melted burnt in the melting of it. And he also heard her at some times speaking of the said plate, say that she would make the Minster bells ring, and that, if she pleased, she could hang a hundred of them. And he hath heard her say that her brother would have given her money to be gone out of the city of York to Dewsbury because she made much talk and discourse of him’.
Mercy’s reckless chatter earned them both a spell in York Castle upon this charge, but it was only hearsay evidence and could not be proved. Awty was soon a free man once more, and an incident in a York street shows his vicious, bullying nature. It seems that Awty had brought a bill of indictment before a York court which had been thrown out by the grand jury there. Now one of these same jurors, an esteemed glass painter named Benedict Hosley, suddenly found himself face to face with Awty in a narrow street with no way of escape. Awty recognised him at once and confronted the timid tradesman in a most frightening manner.
‘Thou art a pitiful fellow,’ he sneared contemptuously, ‘There is thirteen or fourteen of you’ (meaning the grand jury), ‘and I would sell you all to the Devil for twopence apiece.’
Money he certainly had now, and in course of time he looked for a property where he could carry on his counterfeiting in maximum safety. Because of the number of coining gangs operating there, the area encompassed by the towns of Thirsk, Hemsley and Boroughbridge was known in those days as The Unholy Triangle. Here, on the banks of the Swale, near Kirkby Wiske, Awty, now calling himself Otty, found a lonely farmhouse ideally suited to his purpose. The land round about was completely flat, no road led past the property, and any approaching strangers would be visible long before they neared the farm.
Tradition says that he fitted out the cellar there with all the equipment needed for counterfeiting, and with entry by means of a secret staircase from the room above, was able to carry on completely undisturbed. His daughter, Elizabeth, married a man called BUSBY who joined Daniel in the illegal trade, though the two men, apparently, never got on well.
One night in the year 1702, Awty and Busby had a violent quarrel, supposed because Busby felt he was not getting his fair share of the profits. There was a struggle, and Busby strangled his father-in-law. He dragged the body out of the cellar and concealed it under some bushes at a distance from the house. He then returned, covered in mud, sat in his chair and proceeded to get very drunk.
Her husband’s suspicious appearance and behaviour, coupled with her father’s non-appearance at the supper table, aroused Elizabeth’s deepest forebodings. A week later, she denounced Busby, a search was made, and the body found. After being tried and convicted of his father-in-law’s murder, the unfortunate man suffered death by hanging, after which the body was hung in chains on a gibbet near Sand Hutton. The gibbet was long known as Busby Stoop, and the inn there bears the name to this day. The farmhouse, Danotty Hall, is still standing, though much altered since Daniel’s time.
THORSBY, riding north in 1703, wrote in his diary, ‘along the banks of the Swale, and the very pleasant gardens of Sir William Robinson, late Mayo of York, but a few miles after, a most doleful object of Mr Busby hanging in chains for the murder of his father-in-law, Daniel Awty….. who having too little honesty to balance his skill in engraving & etc…., was generally suspected for coining and other indirect ways of attaining that estate which was the occasion of his death, even within sight of his own house.’

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Calendar of State Papers Domestic
Calendar of Treasury Books
West Riding Quarter Sessions Roll: Wakefield Record Office.
Dewsbury P.R. (1538-1653) ed Chadwick: Y.A.S. Claremont, Leeds
Depositions from York Castle: Surtees Society Vol. 40 (1861)
Diary of Oliver Heywood: Volume II p.287.
Criminal Chronology of York Castle: Burdekin (1867)
Diary of Ralph Thoresby: ed. Rev J Hunter (1830)
Justice’s Notebook of Captin John Pickering: Thorsby Society Volume XI Misc.
Thirsk and District Past and Present: Hall (1914)

My Thanks to Miss Lilian Robinson, Dr. G Redmonds and Mr. Bill Harm, Chairman, Thirsk Museum, for information supplied.

NB. The above including the bibliography is retyped from pages 23-25 of a book of unknown title sent to myself by Pam Auty
John Blake - March 2004.




 
Family F203
 
21 (NB. from pension records mostly discharge medical reports but following service details can be extracted)
Enlisted: 26 April 1915, Grove Park
Age given as 40 on enlistment
Age given on medical record 29 Aug 1917, as 49 Yrs 306 days
Age given on medical record 15 Jan 1920, as 52
Address: 24 Blenheim St, Chelsea
Place of birth: Manchester (Chorlton upon Medlock), Lancashire
Trade: Taxi Driver
Religion: Roman Catholic
Height: 5 ft 5 in
Weight: 126 lbs
Deformed right big toe with scar on ball of toe
Next of Kin: Margaret B Auty (Wife), 26 Blenheim Street, Chelsea

Grove Park: 27 Apr 1915
Appointed upaid A/L Cpl 6 Nov 1915, 19 Bdg: R G A
Appointed A/l Cpl 1 Jul 19126 VII Cps: H A
Reverted (Surplies) unpaid A/l Cpl 18 Aug 1916
Home: 26 Apr 1915 - 11 Jul 1915
BEF (France): 12 Jul 1915 - 24 Dec 1916, 283 Coy
Home: 25 Dec 1916
Deprived of Lance Stripe (for misconduct) 1 May 1917
Embarked Southampton 16 May 1917
Disembarked Rouen 18 May 1917
EX S.S. "King Edward" to 1st Base M..T. Depot
To 58th Aux P Coy 16 Jun 1917
Neglect of duty ie. failing to lubricate W ? Lorry 7432, therby causing engine of same to sieze, 20 Oct 1917
To 1st B M T D, 31 Nov 1917
to 4th Aux M T Coy 6 Nov 1917
Award: 7 days CB, absent from fatigue duty from 8.0 am until 10 am, 15 Nov 1917
To 1st B M T D, 8 Dec 1917
8 Gen P, 26 Dec 1917
Invalided to England, 1 Jan 1918
Overseas to 31 Dec 1917
on board ship 1 Jan 1918 to 2 Jan 1918
Home: 1 Jan 1918
Posted to M T Depot Norwood: 18 Feb 1918 - 17 Mar 1918
posted to 606 MT Coy ASC Holland Park: 12 Mar 1918
Demobolization: Transfered to Class "Z" 13 Mar 1919, No 2 Dispersal unit Crystal Palace
 
AUTY, Alfred (I6621)
 
22 (NB. papers are very damaged, som details missing or truncated)
Attested: 28 Aug 1914, Liverpool
Hight: 5ft 3 1/4 in
Weight: 120 ibs
Girth fully exp: 34 1/2 in, range 2 in
Complexion: Sallow
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Dark Brown
Distinctive marks: Scar bridge of nose
Rank: Private
Proceeded to Tidworth: 17 ??? 1914
Joined from S F??: 6 Oct 1915
Posted Duty: 7 Oct 1915
Posted: 14 Dec 1916
Transfered to army reserve class P: 8 May 1917
Discharged 25 Jul 1917 to 28 Aug 1916
various notes dated 22 Jul 1916 to 7 Sep 1916
State that he was placed under arrest by O/C No1 Field Ambulence as a case of self inflicted wound.
he stateed that he had accidentlly wounded himself in the hand when handing a rifle to a man in the trench, does not know the man and has no documentary evidence and was placed under arrest.
Document is damaged but there is mention of a possible Court Martial?

Other papers state Gunshot Wound to Right hand and loss of index finger.

Dischaged due to wounds (no longer physically fit for War Service para 392 (XVI) K.R.
Note stuck to page says:
"Permanently excluded from liability to medical re-examination under the Military Service (Review of Exceptions) Act, 1917"

 
OTTY, Thomas James Albert (I10019)
 
23 (NB. records are badly damaged and unreadable in parts)
Attestation: 15 Mar 1916
Age 23 yrs 5 mths
Trade: Cloth Miller
Next of Kin: Ezra Auty (Father) 2 Dawson Hill, Morley

Home: 15 Mar 1916 - 13 Jan 1917
France: 14 Jan 1917 - 16 Dec 1918
Prisoner of War in Germany: 14 Mar 1917 - 16 Dec 1918
Home: 17 Dec 1918 - 27 Sep 1919
Demobilized: 28 Sep 1919, Transfrered to class "Z"

repremands on record:
Missing in the line without a cause: 14 ? 1916, ?? days CB
Not complying with an order at once & making a mumbling when given an order 15 Jul 1916, 7 Days CB

 
AUTY, John William (I2057)
 
24 , Registered Dec Qtr 1887, South Shields Reg Dst ref 10a/849 Family F2491
 
25 10 Children Family F635
 
26 10 Weeks old AUTY, Ann (I9203)
 
27 10b\369 NEVENSON, Mary (I2263)
 
28 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I8635)
 
29 11 weeks, grave B688 AUTY, John Charles (I9167)
 
30 13 weeks AWTY, James (I1298)
 
31 14 Nov 1896 - Death notice in Wakefield Express, page 8 (to check) AUTY, Jabez (I92)
 
32 14 weeks, National Burial Index lists as Bankshill Chapel, Morley AUTY, Betty (I8758)
 
33 15 weeks old, Regstration Number 1903/7991 AUTY, Alice (I4915)
 
34 16 days old, no service AUTY, Harry (I9426)
 
35 1770 - Blacksmith on baptism of William AUTY, Joshua (I1426)
 
36 1818 - Bapt George, Clothier of Dewsbury AUTY, John (I102)
 
37 1820 - Marriage occupation Waterman
1821 - bapt Hannah as Waterman of Dewsbury
1825 - bapt George as Waterman of Dewsbury
1825 - bapt William as Waterman of Dewsbury
On sale of land details date 4 Jun 1840 as of Scout Hill in Dewsbury, Waterman 
AUTY, William (I121)
 
38 1820 - marriage, occupation as Miner CROWTHER, Joseph (I35)
 
39 1824 - On sale of land in Dawgreen, Dewsbury mentioned as George Awty the younger of Lofthouse in Parish of Rotwell (Rothwell), Joiner AUTY, George (I515)
 
40 1825 - baptism of William at Mirfield gives abode as Waterroyd Lane AUTY, Joseph (I269)
 
41 1831 - bapt Richard, Clothier of Dewsbury
1851 - Whites Trade Directory, Lower Whitley, Mill Manager
1868 - Poll Book as Jabez Auty (snr) of Boothroyd Lane, Trinity Ward, Dewsbury
1871 - Will, Jabez Auty the elder of Dewsbury, overlooker, widower, died 14 Mar 1871, by oath of Richard Auty of Boothroyd Lane, Dewsbury, shopkeeper (son) 
AUTY, Jabez (I9)
 
42 1832 Baines Directory, Woollen Manufacturer, Watergate, Dewsbury
1849 MI in Dewsbury Parish Church yard says of Watergate, Dewsbury 
AUTY, Paul (I1021)
 
43 1855 - Slaters Trade Directory, 54 Kirkgate, Bradford - under Printer & Letter Press AUTY, Squire (I1894)
 
44 1868 - Poll book as Jabez (jnr) of Thornton Street, St Johns Ward, Dewsbury AUTY, Jabez (I20)
 
45 1868 - Poll Book as of Boothroyd Lane, Trinity Ward, Dewsbury
1871 - on Fathers (Jabez) will as of Boothroyd Lane, Dewsbury, shopkeeper 
AUTY, Richard (I11)
 
46 1870 - Will of Squire Auty of Horton at Bradford, under £600, by oath Samual Albert Auty (son) and Thomas Crowther AUTY, Squire (I1894)
 
47 1883: Photographic Artist at 20 Front St, Tynemouth
1890: Kellys Directory, 13 King St, South Shields, Durham - Tobacconist 
AUTY, Matthew (I2153)
 
48 1891 Slaters Directory Beer Retailer, Moor Rd, Thornhill Lees, Dewsbury AUTY, Bentley (I2479)
 
49 1899 - On election roll of Timru, New Zealand AUTY, Frances Emma (I112)
 
50 1899 - On election roll of Timru, New Zealand NEWSOME, Mark (I113)
 

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 261» Next»